Monthly Archives: August 2019

Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #7

Taking an Aspirin is optional. Always consult with your medical provider if you are unsure. Weigh the risks versus the benefits. The use of aspirin has been a controversial conversation and remains a personal choice following proper counselling from a medical provider. Aspirin is an anticoagulant, and from a personal standpoint, if you have a ruptured brain aneurysm, the risk of developing a stroke or a blood clot in the brain that can possibly lead to severe brain damage is high. Taking an aspirin (only if you are the right candidate) when you initially suspect that you have a ruptured brain aneurysm, from my personal view, can help decrease the chances of developing a stroke and/or severe brain damage. Some doctors have told me that when I took that aspirin when I started feeling that something was wrong with me, helped me gain full recovery with no complications whatsoever. Some have remained neutral about the benefits of it. In the end, it all falls back to benefit versus risk.

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Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #6

Listen to your guts. This is the most important tip of them all. When you start having symptoms and you kind of suspect that something is not right with your body, do not stop and play the waiting game. It is better to seek medical help and let them not find anything wrong with you than to wait for things to get worse. If you are a caregiver, seek immediate help if you think something is not normal with your loved one.

Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #5

Have an emergency response system plan in place. Knowing what to do when you find yourself in an emergency scenario can help save you a lot of time and give you a peace of mind. Everybody in your household must know your country of residence emergency phone number. In most countries, it is a three digit number. When we lived in Uganda, we had taught our 3year old how to do the radio checks and he was comfortable with it. Call a friend, a neighbor, a family member, or a coworker and let them know of your situation and current plans so they can check on you since you can’t tell how fast things might change.

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