Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #7

Taking an Aspirin is optional. Always consult with your medical provider if you are unsure. Weigh the risks versus the benefits. The use of aspirin has been a controversial conversation and remains a personal choice following proper counselling from a medical provider. Aspirin is an anticoagulant, and from a personal standpoint, if you have a ruptured brain aneurysm, the risk of developing a stroke or a blood clot in the brain that can possibly lead to severe brain damage is high. Taking an aspirin (only if you are the right candidate) when you initially suspect that you have a ruptured brain aneurysm, from my personal view, can help decrease the chances of developing a stroke and/or severe brain damage. Some doctors have told me that when I took that aspirin when I started feeling that something was wrong with me, helped me gain full recovery with no complications whatsoever. Some have remained neutral about the benefits of it. In the end, it all falls back to benefit versus risk.

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Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #6

Listen to your guts. This is the most important tip of them all. When you start having symptoms and you kind of suspect that something is not right with your body, do not stop and play the waiting game. It is better to seek medical help and let them not find anything wrong with you than to wait for things to get worse. If you are a caregiver, seek immediate help if you think something is not normal with your loved one.

Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #5

Have an emergency response system plan in place. Knowing what to do when you find yourself in an emergency scenario can help save you a lot of time and give you a peace of mind. Everybody in your household must know your country of residence emergency phone number. In most countries, it is a three digit number. When we lived in Uganda, we had taught our 3year old how to do the radio checks and he was comfortable with it. Call a friend, a neighbor, a family member, or a coworker and let them know of your situation and current plans so they can check on you since you can’t tell how fast things might change.

Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #4

Familiarize yourself with your surroundings. Get to know the closest hospital near your residence and the fastest way to get there. This applies to residents and visitors. When we moved to Kampala, Uganda, we spend the first month just trying to familiarize ourselves with the hospitals in the area and the level of care they provided. Knowing the quality and level of care hospitals near you provide is especially important if you are living overseas and particularly in the developing countries. When an emergency hits, time is of an essence. 

Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #3

Know basic CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Knowing what to do especially in the initial stages when you are caught in an emergency scenario can save a life or help reduce the severity of potential adverse effects during and after treatment. The American Heart Association and The Red Cross are the most common organizations that offer CPR training classes for both caregivers and healthcare providers. I would encourage you and your family members, including children above the age of 5 years old, to take a CPR course for caregivers. I tend to think that if my husband had not known how to perform CPR, my story would have been different right now. I became unconscious in less than 3 minutes of me requesting him to give me an aspirin and having taken it. Everything was happening so fast. I started to vomit while at the same time biting on my tongue. That was a perfect scenario that could have easily led to aspiration. With his CPR knowledge, he knew exactly what to do. That was to either keep me in an upright position or side-lying while keeping the airway open. 

Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #2

Get a primary care physician. Most people who consider themselves “healthy” do not see the need to have a primary care physician. The reasoning behind it is that why do you need to go and look for problems if none exists. The fact is, many lives are saved through those physical assessments and preventative care measures. So, get a primary care physician and talk to him or her about your family history and any health concerns that you might have. Remember to keep up with your dental appointments as well.

Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

I will be sharing all the 13 tips( post by post) from my book : Tips on surviving a Brain Aneurysm.

Tip #1

Be curious about your family history. No matter

how old you are, it helps to learn about the members of

underlying health issues they might have. That will

your family, both immediate and extended, and any

enable you to become familiar with those conditions

and assess yourself if you might be at risk. Even though

family history does not always pose a risk to an

individual, it does not hurt to educate yourself. For my

case, I have no family history of the brain aneurysm.

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