Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #3

Know basic CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Knowing what to do especially in the initial stages when you are caught in an emergency scenario can save a life or help reduce the severity of potential adverse effects during and after treatment. The American Heart Association and The Red Cross are the most common organizations that offer CPR training classes for both caregivers and healthcare providers. I would encourage you and your family members, including children above the age of 5 years old, to take a CPR course for caregivers. I tend to think that if my husband had not known how to perform CPR, my story would have been different right now. I became unconscious in less than 3 minutes of me requesting him to give me an aspirin and having taken it. Everything was happening so fast. I started to vomit while at the same time biting on my tongue. That was a perfect scenario that could have easily led to aspiration. With his CPR knowledge, he knew exactly what to do. That was to either keep me in an upright position or side-lying while keeping the airway open. 

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Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

Tip #2

Get a primary care physician. Most people who consider themselves “healthy” do not see the need to have a primary care physician. The reasoning behind it is that why do you need to go and look for problems if none exists. The fact is, many lives are saved through those physical assessments and preventative care measures. So, get a primary care physician and talk to him or her about your family history and any health concerns that you might have. Remember to keep up with your dental appointments as well.

Tips on Surviving a Brain Aneurysm

I will be sharing all the 13 tips( post by post) from my book : Tips on surviving a Brain Aneurysm.

Tip #1

Be curious about your family history. No matter

how old you are, it helps to learn about the members of

underlying health issues they might have. That will

your family, both immediate and extended, and any

enable you to become familiar with those conditions

and assess yourself if you might be at risk. Even though

family history does not always pose a risk to an

individual, it does not hurt to educate yourself. For my

case, I have no family history of the brain aneurysm.

For those who have requested for the link, here it is. A different cover page but same book. Unfortunately, it won’t be in book stores or elsewhere except Amazon (worldwide)until the Amazon kdp select enrollment period is over…end of July. Enjoy!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/r.html?C=2EIU1YSKTC6SW&K=3701Y9VD1DKEK&M=urn:rtn:msg:20190604063042d81e8ac1f7934c3aa42e61fe3440p0na&R=1RMBB4YL1B57Q&T=C&U=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fdp%2F1094723886%3Fref_%3Dpe_3052080_397514860&H=ADQKVA3CDIERA4TPOBI7MRBPEHUA&ref_=pe_3052080_397514860

Depression During Brain Aneurysm Recovery

Dealing with the new you…

Brain Aneurysm is a life-changing event that affects the life of a person in every aspect. How does it feel like to go from “ normal” to being called a “survivor”? The feeling of coming to terms with the new you and letting go of the old you is what traps most survivors and wraps them around the depression face during recovery.

Depression becomes almost like a virus consuming the individual from inside out. You sought of loose yourself for a while in an identity crisis dilemma that your mind has and continues to create. You are basically existing in your own world debating on whether you are better off alive or dead.

While you are being consumed from the inside out, the people around you start to be affected as well. They feel like they have reached a burn out point and underappreciated. This is the point where things start to fall apart. Relationships break, new health concerns arise, finances become a challenge and suicide dominates the mind of the “weak.” This is the saturation point for both parties affected and intervention is a must. While most people don’t get to this point, those who do should try to seek the help of a professional immediately.

Similar to the nature of depression, healing starts from the inside and spreads to the outside. The survivor needs to discover and believe in the reason why he/she is alive. Maybe you’re alive to raise your children or perhaps your grandchildren depend on you or maybe you’re the inspiration that your church needs or the role model that your workplace looks up to or you’re simply the one that touch and changes people’s lives or you’re the reason for someone else’s happiness or maybe your story is what the world is waiting on…whatever the reason might be, try to find it. There is so much joy that comes with that feeling when you know that your life is not a mistake but a miracle and a testimony.

Recovering from a brain aneurysm or any major life-changing event is a journey with a lot of changes along the way. Like we all know, change is hard but the only key to ensure a smooth transition is choosing to concentrate your energy on what matter the most. You must focus on the positives and make the best of every moment because before you know it, that moment will soon be a mere footnote in your life’s story. So please, make it memorable.

Sometimes I look back and try to reflect on all of the changes that I have experienced in life and the reality is, nothing is meant to last forever. We go through seasons in life.

Of all the changes that I have gone through so far, the one that takes the trophy is child birth. The moment before life happens and the baby’s first cry is heard, a woman goes through intense pain. What’s so interesting is that before the baby is delivered, a woman has to experience all the stages of labor until her cervix is ready to let the baby out. It’s that magical moment that the pain is intolerable that the baby makes its victorious entrance into the world. Shortly after that, all the pain is literally replaced with joy. How magical is that!

No matter how many lemons life will throw at you during recovery, make the best of every moment by focusing on the lemonade!

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